Turn positive things into shared experiences

Heads up, heroes!

Your mission, if you choose to accept it today, is to look for and act upon any opportunities to take something positive and make it bigger and better by turning it into a shared experience.

Look for and draw attention to the positive.

If you’ve ever appreciated being noticed for something you take pride in, take a moment to show that same appreciation to someone else.

Give a sincere compliment to a stranger. Like what they’re wearing? Tell them.

Did someone help you? Say so. Even better, tell their boss.

Did you enjoy an experience at an establishment? Tell someone.

Even better, leave a sincere positive review somewhere, even if that means sending an email or leaving a voicemail at the main office. Mention people by name.

Whatever good you come across today, keep the cycle going and the good energy flowing by sharing it.

Take the time. Be someone’s hero.

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Caring, appreciation, and gratitude

The primary message you communicate when you act like you don’t care is that you don’t care.

If you care about something, appreciate it, or are grateful for it, be sure your actions consistently communicate these sentiments.

You may think something, but until you convert a thought into an action, it’s just potential energy.

Remember to reinforce your positive thoughts and feelings with your actions and not solely express yourself through words.

Anyone can say anything. You reinforce the truth in your words when your actions are consistently congruent with not only what you say, but how, where, and when you choose to act.

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‘Experience informs intuition’

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Experience informs intuition. But it does more than that: Experience sets the frame within which we analyze and interpret what we perceive.

You would no doubt expect, for instance, that the “wild child” raised by a pack of wolves would interpret the world from a perspective that differs substantially from your own. Even less extreme comparisons, such as those between people raised in very different cultural traditions, serve to underscore the degree to which our experiences determine our interpretive mindset.

Yet there are certain things that we all experience. And it is often the beliefs and expectations that follow from these universal experiences that can be the hardest to identify and the most difficult to challenge. A simple but profound example is the following. If you were to get up from reading this book, you could move in three independent directions—that is, through three independent, spatial dimensions. Absolutely any path you follow—regardless of how complicated—results from some combination of motion through what we might call the “left-right dimension,” the “back-forth dimension,” and the “up-down dimension.” Every time you take a step you implicitly make three separate choices that determine how you move through these three dimensions.

An equivalent statement, as encountered in our discussion of special relativity, is that any location in the universe can be fully specified by giving three pieces of data: where it is relative to these three spatial dimensions. In familiar language, you can specify a city address, say, by giving a street (location in the “left-right dimension”), a cross street or an avenue (location in the “back-forth dimension”), and a floor number (location in the “up-down dimension”). And from a more modern perspective, we have seen that Einstein’s work encourages us to think about time as another dimension (the “future-past dimension”), giving us a total of four dimensions (three space dimensions and one time dimension). You specify events in the universe by telling where and when they occur.

This feature of the universe is so basic, so consistent, and so thoroughly pervasive that it really does seem beyond questioning. In 1919, however, a little-known Polish mathematician named Theodor Kaluza from the University of Königsberg had the temerity to challenge the obvious—he suggested that the universe might not actually have three spatial dimensions; it might have more.

Sometimes silly-sounding suggestions are plain silly. Sometimes they rock the foundations of physics. Although it took quite some time to percolate, Kaluza’s suggestion has revolutionized our formulation of physical law. We are still feeling the aftershocks of his astonishingly prescient insight.”

Brian Greene (The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions, and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory)

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Remember this day

Remember this day as a fresh start. A new beginning. A clean slate. An optimistic look forward.

Remember this day as a day of hope. A day of unlimited possibilities. A day of immeasurable potential.

Remember this day as an occasion to learn. A day to improve. A day to get things right.

Remember this day as an opportunity to make a positive difference in someone’s life. A day to have a lasting positive impact on those you come in contact with. A day to lead by example.

Remember this day is a symbol.

Because this day, this moment, and every moment that follows is an opportunity to not only be the type of person you want to be, but the type of person you want to be remembered as.

This day is not just a fresh start that comes but once a year, it comes every day — every moment you exist.

This day is your life. And this day and all the days that follow are your legacy.

No one has more of an impact on this day and every day that follows in your life than you do.

Make it a good one.

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Beating yourself up & tearing yourself down.

“My life sucks.”
“I’m a failure.”
“I’m not where I want to be.”

It should be obvious, but even if you’re not exactly where you want to be in life — or you’re unsatisfied with your current situation — beating yourself up over the fact that you aren’t where you wish to be only serves to make things worse.

Rather than help, this kind of negative thinking puts the one person most capable of fighting for your well-being at a disadvantage. It turns you into your own enemy.

You wouldn’t tolerate a friend belittling your accomplishments, rubbing your mistakes in your face, or trying to put you down. So why would you accept that kind of behavior from yourself?

You don’t win an award for seeing how low you can go or how miserable you can make yourself feel.

If you have a tendency to do this, it’s time to stop. It’s time to take note of when your line of thinking is leading you in a downward spiral. It’s time to remind yourself that making yourself feel worse about whatever situation you find yourself in isn’t helpful or necessary and no good will come of it.

“This isn’t helping me. I need to stop thinking this way. I need to stop revisiting these thoughts. I need to focus on something else. I need to remember that, ‘This, too, shall pass’.”

While you may not be able to immediately change the situation you find yourself in, you can change is your attitude about it. And rather than focus on your problems, you can focus on solutions to your problems. Even if the most immediate solution is to stop beating yourself up — because that’s a problem you can solve.

It’s important to remember that success in anything is often comprised of many failures. And comparing your life to others isn’t fair. We are each on our own unique journey. No two people are following the same exact paths in life.

And not only do people rarely make their struggles known, they often don’t highlight their failures either. What you see when you look at others’ lives is often only a fraction of a complete picture.

The reason we struggle with insecurity is because we compare our behind the scenes with everyone else’s highlight reel.” — Steve Furtick

If revisiting the past in your mind makes you miserable or comparing yourself to others makes you feel like a failure, stop doing it. Because no amount of thinking about these things in this way is going to help you. No matter what you do, you cannot change the past.

The only thing you have complete control over is your attitude and how you choose to act in this moment. This moment matters.

Rather than waste time and energy tearing yourself down, use that time to focus on what you want to achieve. Taking steps to stop yourself from feeling worse is a start.

You, more than anyone, have the ability to be your own best friend, it seems a shame to waste that opportunity by becoming your worst enemy.

Retire those tired old dysfunctional thoughts. Push forward with new ones. Be thankful for what you have and work with it and take positive action.

You can be the hero of your life and the champion of your well-being, but first you have fully commit to the role.

And that transformation will only take place after you stop beating yourself up & tearing yourself down.

Don’t give power to your unfriendly thoughts.

*This isn’t about positive thinking or negative thinking. This is about stopping the barrage of unfriendly thoughts that lead one down a debilitating downward spiral that often leaves one feeling helpless and hopeless.

Negative thinking can actually lead to positive change, but it requires that one be in a mental state capable of finding the motivation to initiate that change. There is a huge difference between focusing on self-abuse that makes one’s self miserable and using negative thinking to initiate positive changes.

As I’ve written before, it’s ok not to be happy.

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