Pink Floyd: Time

In a 2003 interview to celebrate the 30th anniversary of Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon, bassist and songwriter, Roger Waters (who was about to turn 30 when the album was released) explained:

“I suddenly realized then, that year, that life was already happening. I think it’s because my mother was so obsessed with education and the idea that childhood and adolescence and… well, everything… was about preparing for a life that was going to start later. And I suddenly realized that life wasn’t going to start later–that it starts at ‘dot’ and that it happens all the time, and that at any point you can grasp the reigns and start guiding your own destiny. And that was a big revelation to me. I mean, it came as quite a shock!”

[You can hear Waters speak some of the above quote in this ambient music mix (cued up).]

LYRICS:

Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day
You fritter and waste the hours in an offhand way.
Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town
Waiting for someone or something to show you the way.

Tired of lying in the sunshine staying home to watch the rain.
You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today.
And then one day you find ten years have got behind you.
No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun.

So you run and you run to catch up with the sun but it’s sinking
Racing around to come up behind you again.
The sun is the same in a relative way but you’re older,
Shorter of breath and one day closer to death.

Every year is getting shorter; never seem to find the time.
Plans that either come to naught or half a page of scribbled lines
Hanging on in quiet desperation is the English way
The time is gone, the song is over,
Thought I’d something more to say.

Home
Home again
I like to be here
When I can

When I come home
Cold and tired
It’s good to warm my bones
Beside the fire

Far away
Across the field
Tolling on the iron bell
Calls the faithful to their knees
To hear the softly spoken magic spell

Songwriters: DAVID GILMOUR, NICHOLAS MASON, ROGER WATERS, RICK WRIGHT

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Your body language shapes who you are

This is a potentially life-changing and powerful TED talk by Amy Cuddy.

Even if you’re a master of body language, it’s worth watching as a reminder of how powerful it can be, not only with regard to how others perceive you, but how you perceive yourself.

20 minutes well spent.

Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are (Link to video)

amy-cuddy-your-body-language-shapes-who-you-are

Excerpt:

“Social scientists have spent a lot of time looking at the effects of our body language or other people’s body language on judgements. And we make sweeping judgements and inferences from body language. And those judgements can predict really meaningful life outcomes like who we hire or promote or who we ask out on a date.”

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The transformative power of classical music

If you have 20 minutes, this is a wonderful TED talk by Benjamin Zander. Benjamin is funny and enlightening. And the last 5 minutes are really good.

“Benjamin Zander has two infectious passions: classical music, and helping us all realize our untapped love for it — and by extension, our untapped love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections.”

The transformative power of classical music (Link to video)

Excerpt:

“Now, I had an amazing experience. I was 45 years old. I’d been conducting for 20 years. And I suddenly had a realization: The conductor of an orchestra doesn’t make a sound. … He depends for his power on his ability to make other people powerful.

And that changed everything for me. It was totally life changing.

People in my orchestra came up to me and said, “Ben, what happened?”

That’s what happened.

I realized my job was to awaken possibility in other people.

And, of course, I wanted to know if I was doing that. And you know how you find out?

You look at their eyes. If their eyes are shining, you know you’re doing it. … If the eyes are not shining, you get to ask a question, and this is the question:

“Who am I being that my player’s eyes are not shining?”

We can do that with our children, too. Who am I being, that my children’s eyes are not shining?

That’s a totally different world.”

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